Safety - Wicked Lasers


NOT A TOY – FOR USE ONLY BY ADULTS
The user must be a mature adult who is aware of the laser's potential to harm eye, skin and materials. Supervise use at all times while laser light is being emitted.

NEVER ALLOW BEAM TO BE NEAR AN EYE
A Class 4 laser's beam can cause instant and permanent eye injury. Keep the beam away from anywhere that a person or animal's eye might be. Prevent hazardous reflections from shiny objects.

PREVENT EXPOSURE TO SKIN OR MATERIALS
A 1-watt beam can burn exposed skin up to 15 meters (50 feet) away. Also, the beam can char, burn or ignite materials – keep it away from dark, thin and combustible materials such as fabrics.

DO NOT USE ILLEGALLY
Many countries, states/provinces and localities have laws regulating laser usage. Follow all laws that apply in your jurisdiction.


ADDITIONAL SAFETY INFORMATION

CLASS 4 LASER HAZARDS

BLINDNESS HAZARD FROM DIRECT BEAM
The direct beam at a close distance can cause instant and permanent eye injury. The Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance for this nominal 1 watt, 1.0 mrad laser is 221 meters (725 feet). Beyond this distance, the beam is not expected to cause injury -- but still, NEVER LOOK INTO A BEAM NO MATTER HOW FAR YOU ARE FROM THE LASER.

BLINDNESS HAZARD FROM REFLECTED BEAM
Even the beam reflection can cause instant eye damage, especially at close range. There are MANY shiny or smooth objects that can reflect a laser beam, such as mirrors and windows. Reflected beams can be just as hazardous as direct beams.

EYE INJURY HAZARD FROM DIFFUSE REFLECTIONS
The laser “dot” is so bright that looking directly at it can cause eye damage. The danger is higher when on white surfaces and at close range. DO NOT USE THIS AS A LASER POINTER.

BURN HAZARD TO SKIN OR MATERIALS
The beam can burn exposed skin up to 15 meters (50 feet) away. Also, the beam can char, burn or ignite materials. This may cause unwanted damage and can be a fire hazard. Be especially cautious when the beam is on dark, thin, and combustible materials such as fabrics.

DAMAGE HAZARD TO CAMERA SENSORS
Laser beams can cause permanent damage to the sensors in cameras, camcorders and smartphones. These sensors are often more sensitive than the human eye, meaning that they can be damaged at lower laser power levels. Avoid having any direct or reflected beams go into the camera's lens.


NOT FOR AUDIENCE EXPOSURE

DO NOT ALLOW EXPOSURE TO PEOPLE OR AN AUDIENCE
Keep the beam away from where people can reach it. For example, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for laser light shows require the closest beams to be at least 3 meters (10 feet) vertically above where an audience member might reasonably stand, and at least 2.5 meters (8 feet) laterally from where an audience member can reach. Only specialized laser projectors with specific prior FDA written approval are allowed to scan into an audience. Wicked Lasers' projectors are NOT designed for audience-scanning.

SCANNING DOES NOT SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE THE RISK
Moving a laser beam around “spreads out” its power and reduces the time it stays on any one spot. In this sense a beam that is scanned (moving) is somewhat safer than a static (non-moving) beam. However, scanning does not significantly reduce the risk. Specifically, it is only 4-10 times less hazardous -- which is not very much considering that a Class 4 beam of 500 milliwatts can cause instant and permanent eye damage. So, do not rely on scanning as a safety measure.


SAFE USE OUTDOORS

USE TERMINATED BEAMS THAT CANNOT SHIFT
If using outdoors, be sure the projector is securely positioned, so it cannot be bumped or otherwise be misaimed. The beam should be projected onto a solid surface that cannot fall over or otherwise allow beams to go into airspace. Supervise use at all times while laser light is being emitted.

DO NOT HIT AIRCRAFT
The bright light from this laser can flash blind or distract a pilot. NEVER AIM ANY LASER TOWARDS AN AIRCRAFT; this is illegal and potentially hazardous. Always be careful any time a laser beam goes into the sky.

FOLLOW ALL LAWS
Many countries, states/provinces and localities have laws regulating laser usage. Follow all laws that apply in your jurisdiction. In the United States:

U.S. PUBLIC USE REQUIRES FEDERAL PRE-APPROVAL
For any use in public (“introduction into commerce”) the user must apply for a variance (permission) using FDA Form 3157. FDA must approve the variance before the show can be performed.

MAY REQUIRE STATE OR LOCAL APPROVAL
A number of states and localities also have requirements such as registration or licensing.

OUTDOOR LASER SHOWS REQUIRE FDA & FAA APPROVAL
U.S. FDA regulations for outdoor laser light shows which go into airspace (e.g., non-terminated) require submission of FAA Advisory Circular 70-1 “Notice of Proposed Outdoor Laser Operation(s)” to the Federal Aviation Administration at least 30 days in advance of the show. FAA must issue a letter stating they do not object to the show; if they do not, FDA will not approve a variance for the laser light show.


LINKS AND RESOURCES
Class 4 Laser Safety Information: LaserSafetyFacts.com/4
Laser lightshow safety information: LaserShowSafety.info
What to do if you are hit by a laser beam: LaserPointerSafety.com/treatment/treatment.html